10 Tips for Landing Your Dream Job in 2018

10 Tips for Landing Your Dream Job in 2018It’s January and most people’s thoughts are on the things they want to change in their lives in the New Year. One of the biggest alterations a person can make is taking a new direction in their career so, every year, “finding the dream job” is usually high up on many people’s New Year’s resolutions list. However, by the end of January, many of the changes that were so urgent and important at the end of December, have gone by the wayside as we slip back into the comfort of our old workplace and familiar routine. Moving jobs or changing careers can be a scary prospect and sometimes people think that it is easier for them to stay where they are — even if they are unhappy — rather than make a fresh start. But there is no reason why landing your dream job cannot become a reality for you in 2018. What you need is a plan; a roadmap that will give you the structure you need to stay disciplined in pursuit of your goals. If your New Year’s resolution is to progress your career, you can’t afford to be casual in the way you pursue it. Most people think that all they have to do is update their CV, send it out to a few agencies, and sit back and wait for the job offers to come in. They are wrong. If you are serious about developing your career in 2018, here are 10 things you can do to make it a reality:   Set your goal. You can’t progress your career if you don’t know what you want to do. Decide where you want to be in five years and figure out what you need to do to make it happen. Give your CV a facelift.  Your CV needs to be clear, easy to read, well-structured and up to date. Hiring managers don’t have time to comb through your CV looking for the right information, they will just move on to the next one. We have lots of CV tips and templates on collinsmcnicholas.ie Use your current role to progress. Taking on a new project at your current job will allow you to gain experience and develop new skills. Should you decide to change jobs it will be a great point to make at interviews. Find a mentor. This can be done informally or through formal mentoring programmes. It is great to have an experienced professional offer advice on how to progress your career and deal with certain situations in the workplace. You should always look to learn from people with more experience than you. There are always ways to get better at what you do. Upskill yourself. Taking a course shows your commitment to lifelong learning and personal development and is always a strong point to make at an interview. It will also give you useful new skills. Get smart on social. Update your LinkedIn profile to reflect your CV and make sure there are no discrepancies between the two. Use all the functionality available within LinkedIn, join relevant groups, build your connections and make comments about topics that interest you. LinkedIn is an excellent tool for online networking as employers commonly use LinkedIn to find suitable job candidates but it is important to engage at least on a weekly basis. Build a network. Networking is still best done face-to-face. Go to industry events or career fairs to build your network and meet new people. Bring plenty of business cards and make sure you follow up afterwards. You never know when you will make that crucial connection that will lead to a great career opportunity so take every chance you can get to meet professionals in your industry. Research the market. Look at the activity of other companies in your industry to see how your skills and experience match their strategy. Could they be organisations to target? Monitor the IDA and Enterprise Ireland websites regularly to keep up to date on companies that are setting up or expanding in Ireland. Build good relationships with recruiters. Build relationships with a small number of trusted, professional recruiters. Meet with the recruiters in person, or at least have a conversation with them over the phone. Blasting out large numbers of emails and not following up with the recruiters will not work. Measure your progress. Set aside some time each week to review how your job search is going, check the various websites and review what is working. Your plan should be constantly evolving as you go.   Happy job hunting in 2018!!           Niall Murray  Managing Director Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group...

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My exciting new job has let me down, so how do I make it challenging and fulfilling?

Question: I left my job with a software company six months ago to take on a more senior role with another firm. The job spec was promising and after the interview it seemed like a company I would have been excited to join. The salary is reasonably high and I don’t have to commute as far. However, I hardly have any work to do. The team I manage is bright, hard-working and keen to take on more challenges. I’ve suggested projects to my employer and he has turned them down. How can I push to find more work and do what they hired me to do? Answer: Feeling underappreciated and under-utilised in your role can be very difficult and frustrating, particularly having moved from what appears to have been a fulfilling role. While it seems that you have isolated boredom and lack of challenge as the key issues here, you must delve a little deeper to consider all aspects of the role and organisation. If your role was to change, would the culture of the organisation still be an issue? If you were given a higher volume of work, would the reporting structure and your level of autonomy be an issue? A career coach can help you think through your situation. Alternatively, take time out alone with a notepad and create a “pros and cons” list. This may help you to appreciate the aspects of the role, organisation and team you enjoy but also isolate the areas that are more difficult or mundane. Request a conversation with your manager to discuss your expectations of the role and organisation from...

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It feels like the time to spread my wings, but should I heed fears about the role on offer?

Question: I am a senior manager in the medtech industry and, after 20 years with my current company, I feel it is time to seek new challenges. I’ve been for several interviews and I’ve been offered the perfect role with another firm. But I am concerned, as I heard the last person in the role damaged staff morale and several team members left as a result. Should I accept the position despite this? How can I go into this new role and invoke a positive working environment for everyone? Answer: Making a change in your work life is a difficult and brave decision to take at any point in your career development. You should balance both your feelings for your current role, as well as the potential development beyond. While you might have heard rumours about your potential new role and the state of morale, there are other things that you need to consider before you even tackle that issue. Be sure about the move for your own reasons first and then you can look forward to how you might address any internal issues. Here are a few things you should consider before deciding if this is the role for you. 1 The organisation Have you looked at the overall structure and culture of the company? The organisation’s position and reputation in the market should be taken into consideration. How does this match with your expectations for your career? Are their ethics, the product or service they provide as well as their ideology in keeping with your outlook? 2. Role content How would you prefer to spend your time...

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Jobseekers Guide – Managing Your Job Campaign

Jobseekers Guide – Managing Your Job Campaign What is a job search campaign? A job search campaign is a structured and consistently employed plan to promote a positive self image and enhance your career opportunities. Key Steps in a Job Search Campaign: • Apply yourself fully to your job search campaign; your job now is to get a new job • Research the market, evaluate possible options and opportunities. • Generate a list of companies to target in your region and research how to target these companies. • Set daily, weekly and monthly targets. • Organise your job search and establish an efficient record keeping system. Succeeding in Today’s Job Market Over half of vacancies are filled without being advertised, this is what is known as the Hidden Job Market. There are many different routes to market, both advertised and hidden: Routes to market 1. Recruitment Agencies Select agencies that best suit your needs. It is important to build a relationship with the recruiter. The onus lies with you to keep in contact with the agency and to follow up regularly. Try and arrange a meeting with the agency and treat it as an interview. Continue to review websites for suitable positions, and if you locate a position that is of interest to you discuss this role with your recruiter and seek their advice. 2. Start Networking Networking events include; Open Coffee Mornings, Chamber of Commerce Meetings, College Seminars, public networking events at local sports / communities / parishes, etc. It is vital to use these opportunities and to be proactive while attending. Attending networking events gives you the opportunity to...

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Jobseekers Guide – CV’s

WRITING YOUR CURRICULUM VITAE What is the purpose of a CV?  A CV is the first thing you think of when applying for a job, and people often wonder what an employer looks for in a good one. Your CV gives you the chance to tell the employer all about yourself and what you have achieved before you even met them. It is important to structure it carefully and include relevant detail. Here are our tips. YOUR CV SHOULD BE: Clear – organised and clearly presented. Concise – not too long and not too short – just get the message across. Consistent – all formatted in the same manner, using the same fonts Complete – tailored to the industry in question – all information must be relevant Current – CV must be fully up to date THE STRUCTURE OF A CV CVs are made up of a number of different sections that contain different kinds of information: Personal Information Your full name, full address, telephone numbers (home and mobile) and email address. Some people also include their place of birth, age, gender and a photograph – but these are optional. Personal Profile (Optional) Include a brief paragraph that gives the employer an insight into your personal qualities, skills and experience. This need only be about 3-4 lines. Education List your academic history in reverse chronological order, include dates, names of colleges/institutions and location. Subjects and examination results should be included if they are directly relevant to the position to which you are applying. You can also include memberships of professional bodies here. Further Training (if appropriate) Depending on your...

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Jobseekers Guide – Cover Letters

Jobseekers Guide – Cover Letters Cover letters are a basic requirement for most jobs, which is why it is so important to know exactly what a good one looks like. There are many examples on our website but here is a brief guide to prepare the perfect cover letter and CV for any job: Writing a Good Cover Letter A cover letter enables you to express your interest in a particular job and organisation, to highlight your main skills and attributes, and to match these to the employer’s selection criteria. You can explain which opportunity you are seeking, express your enthusiasm for the role, and demonstrate how you will make a contribution. Keep a draft copy of your cover letter and change it for each job you apply for. Here are a number of tips for writing a good cover letter: Avoid rewriting your CV in your cover letter. Highlight specific things about your experience and how it relates to the position you are applying for. Keep it simple. Avoid long, drawn out sentences with complicated vocabulary. Limit your cover letter to one page with three to five targeted paragraphs. Use some of the words included in the job description when writing a cover letter. Proofread your letter. Have colleagues/ friends check for mistakes. How to write the cover letter Salutation, Name, Title, Address, & Date Put your name and address, at the top right hand corner of your cover letter. Put the recipient’s name and address further down the left hand side of the page. Address the person by name, rather than using ‘Dear Sir/Madam’. Underline the position you are...

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