Emilio Moya Rosa, “I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club.”

Emilio Moya Rosa, “I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club.”Emilio relocated from Spain and is now Senior OQ Co-Ordinator at GSK, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford When I first moved to Waterford, I knew nothing about the area and didn’t know anyone here. Now, the people I work with have become my family and I love it here. I grew up in a small village in the Castilla-La Mancha region of Spain and studied in Madrid before moving to Brussels for work. I moved to Ireland three years ago, first to work with a company in Lismore and then to my current job at GSK. I knew nothing about Waterford before I moved here. It was scary. I thought that I would move home after a week, but I quickly grew to love it. Irish people are very nice, and my colleagues are helpful and always make sure to include me in any plans they have outside of work. The weather may be a little wet, but I am happy. One of the best things about living in Waterford is hurling. I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club. My friends back in Spain are very intrigued by this, and when they come to visit me, they often buy hurleys as souvenirs! I also coach spin classes and I found a studio nearby to pursue my love of painting. Professionally, I am very happy. I like working for a big company as I encounter new problems to solve every day. It’s never boring. I only live three minutes from work, and last January I was able to buy my own car and who knows, maybe I’ll buy my own house this year?   See why other people are moving to the South East here.  Download our South East Relocation Survey here.  Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group would like to thank Emilio Moya Rosa for writing this guest blog as part our South East Relocation blog series on living and working in Waterford, Wexford, Carlow, Kilkenny and Tipperary.  For job opportunities in the South East, contact our...

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South East Relocation Survey 2018

Quality of life, short commutes and more disposable income reasons top talent are being drawn to the sunny South East   Over three quarters of professionals who relocated have more disposal income – new survey shows 95% of respondents say their work/life balance has improved since moving to the South East 64% commute to work in less than 20 minutes and 75% find rental prices more reasonable now A new survey has found that highly-skilled professionals from all over the world are moving to the South East for a better work/life balance, career opportunities, shorter commutes to work, lower living costs and more disposable income. The South East Relocation Survey, released today (Wednesday, July 4) was carried out by National Recruitment & HR Services Group Collins McNicholas in conjunction with IDA Ireland. The report included responses from workers who have relocated from 20 different countries including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, Spain, the US, the UK and beyond. A massive 95% of respondents say they now have a better balance between their working and home lives. Since relocating to the South East — 86% have a work commute that is less than 40 minutes and 64% now have a commute less than 20 minutes. Interestingly, while 41.07% of those who moved back were originally from the South East, some 33% relocated from outside of Ireland. When asked about the factors that influenced their move to the South East, 86.36% cited a better quality of life while some 51% referenced being closer to family and friends. The other main reasons given were: career opportunities, lower property prices, a reduced cost...

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How can I build up staff morale even though I don’t have a budget for team building?

  Q: I recently took up a new role as a mid-level manager at a small advertising agency. I’m very excited to put my stamp on the place, especially when it comes to working relationships as I have noticed that many employees are generally unhappy in their job and I want to fix this. I’ve approached the CEO about a team-bonding activity, but he says it is not in the budget. What other ways can I improve the general atmosphere in the company environment?   A: In the current job market, employees and candidates expect more than just a paycheque. Compensation and benefits now often include a more holistic approach, encompassing employee well-being and corporate social responsibility. Attracting and retaining the best employees for your organisation is an ongoing challenge and, according to research, “unhappy” or disengaged employees are less productive, less reliable and less flexible. Here are some ways to begin establishing a more positive work environment.   1 Measure: While a perception that “most employees are generally unhappy” is a concern, taking a clear measure or barometer of sentiment creates a much clearer snapshot of the level of engagement and motivation in the organisation. This measure can then be viewed in conjunction with performance or sales data, for example, in order to establish an overall “state” of the organisation. This should help to build your business case for change and also provide a baseline to measure the impact of your intervention at a later date. 2 Involve others: Any intervention developed should involve the input of others on the team. Pushing ahead with an event or a plan, without asking...

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3 reasons why it’s important to give ‘a piece of our time’ to Jigsaw

We recently announced our charity partnership for 2018/2019 and we’re thrilled to be committing ‘A Piece of our Time’ to the charity Jigsaw – the National Centre for Youth Mental Health. Here’s why our group chose Jigsaw and why we think it’s such an important charity to support. 1. Supporting Our Youth When choosing a charity to work with this year, we as Directors of the group decided to take a step back and ask ourselves why we were really doing this. We didn’t want this to be just a tick the box exercise. Something that other companies are doing, so we better too. This is one of the reasons why myself, Antoinette and Michelle decided to leave the decision in the capable hands of our staff and ask them to vote on the company’s charity of choice for 2018/2019. Our Culture Team had a big input in the research and decision-making process and we are extremely grateful to them for this. We’re delighted that in the end they chose to partner with Jigsaw. It was a charity we all connected with and one that means a great deal to us all. Many of us are parents and therefore have a responsibility to ensure support is available for our own children, today and well into the future. For this reason, Jigsaw is a very special charity to us. 2. Our Employees It was also important to us that our employees connected with the charity and really got a sense of the brilliant work that Jigsaw do for young people across Ireland. Many of our team have children of their own, as well as siblings, some of which...

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How can I boost retention rates and stop staff leaving my company after three years?

Q: I’ve been running my own business for the last 10 years and several staff have been here since the beginning. However, we are having trouble retaining new hires. Anytime someone new joins, it starts off extremely well – but then they leave after two to three years. How can I grow my business when I can’t retain new people?   A: While turnover in an organisation is normal and healthy, it appears that you are struggling to retain employees at a particular stage in their career. This may be due to internal factors or to external ‘pulls’ from competitors. The modern career is often characterised by three- to five-year cycles. Ensuring employees are engaged and developing through these cycles should ensure the longevity of your workforce. You must gather information on why it is happening from as many sources as possible. Here are a few pointers:   1 Focus Group: In order to solve this issue, it is vital to first understand the underlying causes. Insights can be gained by conducting focus groups with employees regarding their levels of engagement, any differences between their initial expectations of the role and the reality of their day-to-day work lives. Care should be taken in preparing for these sessions. All communications shared must be phrased positively, the confidentiality of information guaranteed and a safe space for discussion established. While encouraging useful discussion is a priority, avoid negative confrontations or irrelevant chat. To this end, it may be useful to engage an expert to assist you. Following the discussion, it is vital that an action plan is developed so that your efforts...

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I know I am being managed out of my HR job by firm’s new owners – what should I do?

Question: I’ve enjoyed my role as Head of Human Resources with a large tech company for five years. A year ago, the company was taken over and the new owners brought in their own executives. Since then I’ve been moved to a smaller office and excluded from important meetings. I’ve been in the industry long enough to know that I am being ‘managed out’. Should I stay and fight or accept the inevitable payout? Answer: The turbulent times brought about by a company takeover can be challenging and unsettling in the immediate aftermath and the initial transition phase. Adapting to new approaches, while struggling to establish yourself in a changed environment, can become a negative cycle if not managed carefully. I suggest these steps: 1.Investigate the situation objectively It seems that the transition period has been particularly difficult for you and has left you feeling unappreciated and disengaged. It is important, however, to take time to assess the situation objectively before making any firm decisions. Coaching sessions can provide a safe space to consider the reality of the situation and assist you in separating your emotional response to the changes from the business reality. Work with a coach who is appropriately trained, experienced and understands your needs. Questions you may consider include: How has your role changed? How has the organisation changed? How have my feelings towards the organisation changed? Is the situation short-term or long-term? 2.Explore your options Having established a strong relationship with a coach, you can now explore all options in a safe space. This will help you to plan potential conversations with management, discuss your...

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