Heavy Diesel Mechanics in New Zealand

Heavy Diesel Mechanics in New ZealandThe Opportunity Are you looking for a unique job opportunity? Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group are currently seeking to hire Heavy Diesel Mechanics for a company based in New Zealand –  our first ever roles to be offered in New Zealand and a clear indication of the progress we have made in international recruitment markets. Our growth overseas is an exciting step for the Collins McNicholas Group and we look forward to expanding our reach even further. The Role The successful candidates for these roles will be responsible for performing mechanical service and repair work assigned in the field while also satisfying customers in the field by carrying out work at a high level of quality in an efficient manner. Our client is an accredited employer with Immigration New Zealand, with 17 branches across the entire country offering generous relocation packages. So, why consider New Zealand? Although quite a distance from Ireland, New Zealand is said to have a similar climate (but with warmer summers!) and landscape, and is widely considered one of the most scenic countries in the world. From hiking and skiing in the mountains to surfing and kayaking, there is something for everyone no matter what part of the country you relocate to. There is also a vibrant city life in some of the larger towns such as Auckland, Wellington and Queensland.  New Zealand has a population of almost 5 million people and is steeped in culture. Their people are known for a relaxed and friendly personality, communities are very closely knit and expats are welcomed with open arms year after year. The cost of living can vary depending on where in the country you are based, but in general is quite reasonable. In 2016 Auckland and Wellington were named 98th and 123rd respectively in the world in terms of cost (Dublin was 47th), meaning you can maintain a relatively high standard of living. Making the Move While New Zealand is on the other side of the world (which may seem daunting), organising a move there is actually very straight-forward, particularly when finding a job with an accredited employer there which makes the acquisition of a visa significantly easier.  There are a number of things to get set up before going which we’ve listed below: Apply for a visa at immigration.govt.nz Check what you are permitted to bring to New Zealand with you at customs.govt.nz Open a New Zealand bank account (online anytime – common banks include BNZ, ANZ, ASB and Westpac. Credit ratings can be found here) Apply for a tax number (IRD number) at ird.govt.nz Find accommodation. Many rental properties can be found at trademe.co.nz Socialising and meeting new people is a key part of any move and there are Facebook groups created for people in all parts of New Zealand with different interests and hobbies, making it very easy to meet people. Sports and clubs are extremely popular also and there is a wide variety to choose from, while another useful method of meeting people is City Council Libraries which have information on local events and community classes. More information on City Council’s can be found here. If you are moving as a family, there are a number of resources to help you. Kiwi Families provides advice for growing families in New Zealand, as well as information on the education system and integration. The ages for attending school are similar to Ireland and full information on this can be found at www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/living-in-nz/education/. If you are contemplating applying for positions in New Zealand with Collins McNicholas, or would like further information on the opportunity I am available for a confidential discussion on the roles and the opportunity in New Zealand by both phone or email. Please contact me, Edyta Flemming, at edyta.fleming@collinsmcnicholas.ie or 091 706721. More useful information on New Zealand can be found via the links below: www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/living-in-nz/ https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/abroad/new-zealand https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/new-zealand/articles/the-10-best-places-to-live-in-new-zealand/ https://www.roughguides.com/gallery/most-beautiful-country-in-the-world/ Apply Now           Edyta Fleming Recruitment Consultant Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services...

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How can I ensure that my assistance to the CEO counts towards a possible promotion?

Q: I am a long-term general manager at a relatively small food-production company that recently appointed a new CEO. I have been tasked with familiarising her with certain company strategies. While I am happy to do this, I am worried that I won’t get the recognition I deserve. I would love for this to contribute to a chance for promotion. However, as I have been passed over a couple of times for promotion, I fear it won’t. Should I bring this up now before applying for the promotion? A: The quick answer is: Yes. This is the ideal time to bring it up, as generally, a new CEO can mean a fresh start and new opportunities. Don’t assume just because you have previously shown interest in promotions, that the business is aware you are still interested. It is up to you to make your employers aware of your aspirations. Key questions to ask yourself From your question, it appears you have quite an in-depth knowledge of the business, and this is very likely the reason why you have been given the responsibility to bring the new CEO up to speed. You need to ask yourself why you have not been successful in getting promoted. Have you received feedback on past interviews? If so, have you understood the reasoning behind this? Have you discussed professional career training and a development plan? Who has tasked you with the role of familiarisation of the CEO – is it the business owner? Do they make, and will they continue to make, the decision about your career opportunities over and above the CEO? Planning...

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Emilio Moya Rosa, “I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club.”

Emilio relocated from Spain and is now Senior OQ Co-Ordinator at GSK, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford When I first moved to Waterford, I knew nothing about the area and didn’t know anyone here. Now, the people I work with have become my family and I love it here. I grew up in a small village in the Castilla-La Mancha region of Spain and studied in Madrid before moving to Brussels for work. I moved to Ireland three years ago, first to work with a company in Lismore and then to my current job at GSK. I knew nothing about Waterford before I moved here. It was scary. I thought that I would move home after a week, but I quickly grew to love it. Irish people are very nice, and my colleagues are helpful and always make sure to include me in any plans they have outside of work. The weather may be a little wet, but I am happy. One of the best things about living in Waterford is hurling. I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club. My friends back in Spain are very intrigued by this, and when they come to visit me, they often buy hurleys as souvenirs! I also coach spin classes and I found a studio nearby to pursue my love of painting. Professionally, I am very happy. I like working for a big company as I encounter new problems to solve every day. It’s never boring. I only live three minutes from work, and last January I was able to buy my own car and who knows, maybe I’ll buy my own house...

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I know I am being managed out of my HR job by firm’s new owners – what should I do?

Question: I’ve enjoyed my role as Head of Human Resources with a large tech company for five years. A year ago, the company was taken over and the new owners brought in their own executives. Since then I’ve been moved to a smaller office and excluded from important meetings. I’ve been in the industry long enough to know that I am being ‘managed out’. Should I stay and fight or accept the inevitable payout? Answer: The turbulent times brought about by a company takeover can be challenging and unsettling in the immediate aftermath and the initial transition phase. Adapting to new approaches, while struggling to establish yourself in a changed environment, can become a negative cycle if not managed carefully. I suggest these steps: 1.Investigate the situation objectively It seems that the transition period has been particularly difficult for you and has left you feeling unappreciated and disengaged. It is important, however, to take time to assess the situation objectively before making any firm decisions. Coaching sessions can provide a safe space to consider the reality of the situation and assist you in separating your emotional response to the changes from the business reality. Work with a coach who is appropriately trained, experienced and understands your needs. Questions you may consider include: How has your role changed? How has the organisation changed? How have my feelings towards the organisation changed? Is the situation short-term or long-term? 2.Explore your options Having established a strong relationship with a coach, you can now explore all options in a safe space. This will help you to plan potential conversations with management, discuss your...

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Why do I feel like my role hasn’t changed since my promotion to a management position?

Question: I was recently promoted to marketing manager within my organisation. During my interview, I was told that I would have more responsibility over certain project duties. But six months on I am still doing the same work. While my pay has increased, I feel like I’m not being challenged. I would like to take on more responsibility and progress my career. How can I address this situation with my boss? Answer: Firstly, congratulations on your promotion. In many cases, internal promotions do not get the same level of credence as moving to another business does. Selling your capabilities to your existing organisation can be more difficult, as they are acutely aware of you before the interview even happens. There isn’t always a job spec with internal promotions, so if you do not have one, your first step is to request one from your manager. A suggestion would be to create a draft job spec, based on your knowledge and expectations of the role, and send this to your manager to review and confirm. Your manager may not be fully aware of what you do on a day-to-day basis, and this is an ideal opportunity to further highlight your value to the organisation. It is important that you structure your approach to ensure that all parties are on the same wavelength. Start by setting up a meeting between you and your manager. While you have been promoted, it appears that you have only received a pay rise – and no extra responsibilities. This may be enough for some, but you want to progress your career so it is important...

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My manager is being cold with me since I got my promotion. What should I do?

Question: I was offered a promotion recently and I am now working equally alongside a manager who trained me when I moved to the company five years ago. Since I was promoted, she has become cold and distant towards me. I’ve always respected this manager and I was looking forward to working with her on a team. How can I address her attitude without undermining her?   Answer: Congratulations on getting your promotion to manager. It’s always a wonderful feeling to be recognised for your contribution to the company. However, it can be tarnished if you are not feeling the shared excitement from your co-workers or members of the management team. So, it can be a testing time to ensure you get all relationships back on track. I’ve got bad news and good news – the bad news is that you can’t control how others are going to react to your promotion. You may be surprised as to how some of the team react, but you need to be ready for this. The good news is that you can reach out to them to see what concerns they have regarding your promotion in order to build a better working relationship together. Resentment can creep in from other employees, almost unavoidably, be they direct reports or even current managers whom you may be working alongside. If they were already a manager based within the company, they may feel you did not deserve the promotion and perhaps that someone else should have got it over you. Walking in their shoes is a good place to start as they probably have mixed emotions right...

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