How can I ensure that my assistance to the CEO counts towards a possible promotion?

How can I ensure that my assistance to the CEO counts towards a possible promotion?Q: I am a long-term general manager at a relatively small food-production company that recently appointed a new CEO. I have been tasked with familiarising her with certain company strategies. While I am happy to do this, I am worried that I won’t get the recognition I deserve. I would love for this to contribute to a chance for promotion. However, as I have been passed over a couple of times for promotion, I fear it won’t. Should I bring this up now before applying for the promotion? A: The quick answer is: Yes. This is the ideal time to bring it up, as generally, a new CEO can mean a fresh start and new opportunities. Don’t assume just because you have previously shown interest in promotions, that the business is aware you are still interested. It is up to you to make your employers aware of your aspirations. Key questions to ask yourself From your question, it appears you have quite an in-depth knowledge of the business, and this is very likely the reason why you have been given the responsibility to bring the new CEO up to speed. You need to ask yourself why you have not been successful in getting promoted. Have you received feedback on past interviews? If so, have you understood the reasoning behind this? Have you discussed professional career training and a development plan? Who has tasked you with the role of familiarisation of the CEO – is it the business owner? Do they make, and will they continue to make, the decision about your career opportunities over and above the CEO? Planning Take some time to analyse your own strengths and areas of development. You need to be very critical of your capabilities, as self-awareness is a key skill for any business leader. If possible, complete a 360 review. This is confidential feedback from direct-line reports which will also highlight key strengths and areas for development. Start the planning – begin with the end in mind: where do you want to be in the short to medium term? It is important to make this career-specific, not business-specific. A tip for planning is to make ‘Smart’ goals. Specific: Ensure that your goals are clear, concise and focused on what you wish to achieve; Measurable: Ensure you can track your progress throughout the plan; Achievable: Your goals should be realistic and attainable; Relevant: Align your own personal goals with the goals of the business; Time: The key here is to set target dates and stick to those. Meet and present The first thing to do is to ensure the right people and key decision makers are at the meeting – ideally, this should include the new CEO. Be conscious that the CEO may only just be in the door and, while it is an opportunity to align your aspirations with that of the CEO, they may not be able to make commitments or put plans in place at this stage. If this is the case, you need to ensure you confirm a time to follow up and stick to it. When you do meet, discuss your career goals and how you plan to achieve these in line with benefiting the business overall. It is important that when you present your goals, you align these with the goals of the business and ensure your employers are aware of how developing and promoting you as a key employee will benefit the organisation overall. Set out a plan that is agreeable to both yourself and the CEO, and as noted, make sure the goals are ‘Smart’. The key is to ensure that you set timelines and stick to these. Finally, you appear to be driven in progressing your career. However, if you come to believe that the opportunity that you are looking for in the development of your career is not with your employer, you may need to start assessing external opportunities. It is important that you make an educated decision on this move, and investigate all opportunities within your organisation before looking for opportunities elsewhere.           David Fitzgibbon Mid-West Regional Manager Collins McNicholas Recruitment and HR Services Group This article was originally published in the business section of The Sunday Independent on Sunday, July 9th, 2018, and can be viewed...

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A focus on the medtech industry in the West of Ireland?

Medical device companies are dispersed throughout Ireland. Their presence means that there is a steady supply of talent in every region, allowing medtech companies to easily set up a facility anywhere they choose, but how is the industry performing in the West of Ireland? Co. Galway Galway is the most important medtech cluster in the country. Galway has a vibrant ecosystem of medical technology start-ups, multinationals and research centres that in total accounts for approximately 31% of all medical device employment in Ireland. Galway has significant expertise in vascular technologies, which are dominated by Boston Scientific and Medtronic. Boston Scientific is the largest medical device employer in Ireland with a staff of more than 4,500 across 3 sites located in Clonmel, Cork and Galway. Its range of products include drug eluting stents, structural heart products, pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD). Boston Scientific employs around 3,000 people in Galway. Medtronic has roughly 2,000 staff working at its Galway facility, including over 100 employees working in R&D. Creganna employs over 800 people globally and is headquartered in Galway, providing outsourced solutions for medical device companies. It can provide design, manufacturing, clinical and regulatory support specialising in minimally invasive delivery and access devices such as catheters. In April 2016, TE Connectivity Ltd a world leader in connectivity and sensors, acquired Creganna Medical Group. Other notable companies in Galway include Merit Medical, Cambus Medical, Crospon and Zimmer who opened a facility in Oranmore along with their well-established facility in Shannon. The medical device industry in Galway is continually expanding, with SMT, Allergan (formerly known as Zeltiq) and Surmodics all making job announcements...

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10 things you didn’t know about Ireland’s medtech industry

The outlook for the medical technology industry, both globally and in Ireland, is extremely positive. Here’s why: 50% of medtech companies engage in research & development. Engineering skills are in strong demand; process engineers, automation engineers, lean six sigma engineers, validation engineers, quality engineers, NPD engineers, and polymer engineers are all sought after. The med tech industry has a strong regional presence with an excellent geographic spread. Government support for the industry includes the creation of Springboard courses to retrain professionals with new skills, a national programme to increase STEM course applications, and Science Foundation Ireland funding support for several research & development centres. There is a very strong pool of indigenous senior and executive talent within the industry, both in Ireland and globally of Irish expats. The industry alone employs over 32,000 people and has €12.6 billion worth of exports annually. Ireland host 18 of the 25 largest medtech companies in the world. Salaries and benefits are competitive and have largely remained stable over the last 12 months. There is some upward pressure on niche engineering and science skills that are in demand. The fastest growing subsectors of the industry are in-vitro diagnostics, connected health, and combination devices. The future talent pool looks strong; educational trends show an increase in STEM graduates over the last 10 years as well as greater enrolment in engineering and other STEM courses. Level 8 engineering and technology first preference applications have increased by 26%, while science applications have increased dramatically by 78%. Collins McNicholas expect the sector to continue to grow over the next few years due to increased demand for medical device products globally....

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Med Tech Report | Collins McNicholas

A new report shows that Ireland’s medical technology sector employs over 32,000 people, hosts 18 of the 25 largest medtech companies in the world, and has €12.6 billion worth of exports annually, making Ireland the fifth largest exporter in Europe. Ireland develops some of the most sophisticated products in the industry, with particular strengths in high value manufacturing and R&D. Half of all medtech companies in Ireland now have a dedicated R&D function. There will be approximately €27 billion spent on R&D by medtech companies in 2018 and this figure will grow in subsequent years as companies continue to integrate new technologies into their existing products and develop new products. There are over 450 medtech companies in Ireland and 60% of these are indigenous SMEs. The global medtech market was worth an estimated €422 billion in 2017 and is expected to reach €455 billion by 2020, this presents the Irish Medtech sector with an excellent opportunity to grow. Ireland continues to receive major international investments and has generated continuous employment growth in recent years. Collins McNicholas believes the outlook for the medical device industry in Ireland to be very positive and anticipates robust growth in the years ahead as the industry takes advantage of expanding global demand for medical technologies. Critical to Ireland’s position will be its ability to provide a sufficient number of qualified professionals for the industry. Over 2,000 jobs have been created in the medical technology sector since 2014 and another 4,000 jobs are expected to be created by 2020. Through a combination of increased graduate output, a greater number of retraining and apprenticeship programmes, and...

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Emilio Moya Rosa, “I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club.”

Emilio relocated from Spain and is now Senior OQ Co-Ordinator at GSK, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford When I first moved to Waterford, I knew nothing about the area and didn’t know anyone here. Now, the people I work with have become my family and I love it here. I grew up in a small village in the Castilla-La Mancha region of Spain and studied in Madrid before moving to Brussels for work. I moved to Ireland three years ago, first to work with a company in Lismore and then to my current job at GSK. I knew nothing about Waterford before I moved here. It was scary. I thought that I would move home after a week, but I quickly grew to love it. Irish people are very nice, and my colleagues are helpful and always make sure to include me in any plans they have outside of work. The weather may be a little wet, but I am happy. One of the best things about living in Waterford is hurling. I play corner back for Melleray/Glen Rovers GAA club. My friends back in Spain are very intrigued by this, and when they come to visit me, they often buy hurleys as souvenirs! I also coach spin classes and I found a studio nearby to pursue my love of painting. Professionally, I am very happy. I like working for a big company as I encounter new problems to solve every day. It’s never boring. I only live three minutes from work, and last January I was able to buy my own car and who knows, maybe I’ll buy my own house...

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