What Skills do Medical Device Companies Need?

What Skills do Medical Device Companies Need?The medical technology industry affords great opportunities for qualified professionals across a broad range of disciplines. Engineering We have seen a strong demand nationally for a range of engineering professionals; process engineers, lean six sigma engineers, quality engineers, validation engineers, manufacturing engineers, NPD engineers, automation engineers, process design engineers, and polymer engineers are all sought after. Salaries in this sector have been relatively stable over the last 12 months, with a small number of pay increases in certain niche areas. Demand for engineers will remain strong over the next few years. This steady demand for engineering skills will lead to certain pressure points in supply as the industry continues to grow, but the output of new engineers, the dispersed nature of the existing engineering talent, and the experience the Institutes of Technology have in servicing the demands of medical device multinationals, will ensure there is no critical shortage of engineering skills in the industry. Science Alongside these engineering skills there is an increased demand for biotechnology and pharmaceutical related skills. Personnel with qualifications in the biological sciences, chemistry and pharmacology are becoming more important as well. The convergence of different technologies with medical device products means that there is a demand for expertise in the areas of nanotechnology, software, ICT, maths, statistics, informatics and bioprocessing, and material science. There has been an increase in the pace of automation as the industry in Ireland shifts towards the production of more high value products. This requires greater training for employees in the industry, and places more pressure on 3rd level institutes to produce the necessary volume of graduates. Overall, this will drive up the quality of employment in the industry and increase Ireland’s competitiveness internationally. ICT ICT skills are playing an increasing role in the medical device industry, particularly in the area of connected health. Government efforts to increase the ICT graduate output have been very successful, but the rapidly expanding incorporation of ICT into other industries means that a greater increase in graduate output is required in order to keep pace with this rise in demand. The government sponsored Springboard programme offered 21 ICT conversion courses in 2014, and is providing a further 42 courses in the 2015/16 academic year, which should help address the demand for ICT professionals. Springboard also provided 14 medtech courses in 2014/15. In addition to the demand for the major technical skills, highly qualified staff are also needed in support functions such as regulatory affairs, HR, finance, ICT, and sales. Irish third level institutes will be able to match demand for these skill sets going forward. Graduates Sustained efforts at encouraging STEM careers and the provision of conversion courses should ensure there are sufficient numbers of graduates. CAO Level 8 first preference applications for STEM courses, which include science, engineering, computing and construction, have increased by 18% over the 5 years since 2010. Individually there has been a 23.9% rise in engineering applications, a 47.6% rise in computing applications, a 17.2% rise in science applications, and a drop of 36.1% in construction applications. This increase in STEM applications has been ongoing since 2007 but there are still minor shortages in certain disciplines. CAO application trends suggest that this will abate over the next few years. The government are devising a new apprenticeship programme in consultation with industry to provide more skilled professionals at technician level. This will further bolster the supply of qualified personnel for the medical device industry. Conclusion The medical device industry affords excellent opportunities for graduates and experienced professionals across a range of disciplines. Salaries are competitive and employment opportunities can be found in every region of the country. Medical device companies can expect a good supply of graduates over the next few years and professionals will experience an expanding range of job opportunities and the industry continues to grow.   Niall Murray, Managing Director Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services...

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The PorterShed Officially Launched and Ready for Business

Christopher O’Toole (Technical Consultant) and I were delighted to attend the official launch of the PorterShed, Galway, which is the new innovation hub for start-ups located in the heart of Galway City’s new Innovation district.  What an amazing transformation of a historic building into a funky modern co-working space – well done to all of the board members who have worked tirelessly over the past number of months and in particular congratulations to Maurice O’Gorman, John Breslin and Dave Cunningham who made this vision a reality.  There is a true sense of community once you walk in through the vibrant red door, a warm welcome for everyone and a great sense of pride in showcasing what Galway can achieve to ‘future proof’ the start-up business community and contribute to the economic recovery for the region. Collins McNicholas are delighted to have been able to assist the board during their journey in setting up the facility and we thank you for your acknowledgement of same at the official launch last night – we truly look forward to working with the occupants of the PorterShed moving forward.  We are delighted to announce that will be ‘hot desking’ at the PorterShed on a more regular basis and will be available to provide Recruitment and HR advice to the companies located there, and also available to advise any budding entrepreneurs based in the West who need some guidance around these two particular business areas. Continued success to the PorterShed team, to Mary Rodgers (PorterShed Community Manager) and all of the occupants. Michelle Murphy Director Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services...

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6 Tips When Starting a New Job

Beginning a new job is always a little intimidating. Everyone wants to get off to a great start and impress their new boss, but nerves and uncertainty about a new work environment often stop us from settling into our new job as quickly as we would like. To help you make the best start possible in your new job, we are giving our top 6 tips for starting a new job: First Impressions Count  The single most important thing you can do on your first day is make a good impression with your colleagues. The impact of a bad first impression can linger for a long time, and prove quite difficult to overcome. It is vital that you are punctual and enthusiastic. Show everyone that you are happy to be there. Learn Your Role   Obtain a detailed job description from your boss so that you know precisely what is expected of you, and what you are responsible for. Having a clear understanding of your duties and responsibilities will help you prioritise how much time to give each task. In situations where you are working under a tight deadline, knowing what is the most important task to be completed will help you avoid making any costly mistakes. Understand the Culture  Learn the culture of the company. Most employees will undergo a training period when they start their job. Use this time wisely. Learn everything you can about the company’s policies and procedures, observe how people interact with one another and how they go about their work. Talk to everybody, your new colleagues will be a great source of information on...

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8 Tips for Staying Calm During a Job Interview

The thought of an interview is often a daunting one. If you remain cool and calm during an interview, you will project an air of confidence which is attractive to a potential employer. You will also demonstrate that you can remain calm when stressful situations arise in the course of your work. To stop nerves getting the better of you, here are some tips to secure that coveted job: Be Prepared Know the job you are interviewing for, review the job description and understand what you can bring to the role. Research the company, their products/services and their competitors. Go onto their website and use LinkedIn to learn about the person who is interviewing you. Practice The more we practice, the more skilled we become. Don’t memorize exact answers to likely interview questions, but do have points prepared of what you want to say to a potential employer. Think about why you want the job and what makes you a great candidate for it.  If you can, do a mock interview with a friend. Nerves tend to make us speak very quickly so try and watch out for that during the mock interview. Arrive Early and Relax Allow yourself plenty of time to get to the interview; you don’t want to give a bad impression by being late. Try to arrive early to give yourself time to gather your thoughts and take a few deep breaths. Think positively and be confident You have already been short listed for interview so the company obviously thinks you can do the job. Focus on your strengths and this will help calm your...

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