Wellbeing | Collins McNicholas

Can Encouraging People to Take Initiative Actually be Harmful?

Can Encouraging People to Take Initiative Actually be Harmful?As organizations face uncertainty and rapid change, taking initiative or being proactive is increasingly encouraged. In the main, being proactive is beneficial for both individual employee performance as well as for organisational performance. There is one circumstance when taking initiative has a negative effect on well-being for employees – when employees are motivated by a sense of pressure and coercion at work (termed controlled motivation) without any sense of interest or identification with their work (termed autonomous motivation). This was demonstrated in a recent article by Karoline Strauss (ESSEC, France), Sharon Parker (UWA, Australia) and Deirdre O’Shea (UL, Ireland), published in the Journal of Vocational Behavior. Proactivity at work involves self-initiating change or ‘making things happen’. It requires effort and thus drains employees energy, one of the reasons why it is associated with impaired well-being.  This research demonstrated that proactive work behaviour was positively related to job strain when controlled motivation was high and autonomous motivation was also low. Under all other conditions, there was no effect of proactive behaviour on job strain. Thus, proactive behaviour has costs for employee well-being when employees experience a sense of pressure and obligation in their work in the absence of any compensating interest or identification with their work. Under these circumstances, engaging in proactive behaviour is unlikely to be sustainable in the long-term, and it could result in more extreme forms of well-being impairments such as burnout, sickness absence and turnover. There is increasing pressure on individuals to engage in proactive behaviour in order to meet the expectations of the organization. It would be wise for organisational leaders and managers to take heed of the findings from this research when they consider the expectations on employees to take initiative and be proactive. In order to enable proactive behaviour that does not increase job strain, organizations need to promote high levels of interest and identification with work. One way to promote this is to provide employees with some control over their job and their work tasks. Work redesign to enhance job control might be an important strategy for preventing the incidence of proactivity-induced job strain. Leadership has the potential to promote autonomous forms of motivation, such as by enhancing employees’ sense of meaningfulness, competence, impact, and choice. Link to article: Strauss, K., Parker, S. & O’Shea, D. (2017).  When Does Proactivity Have a Cost? Motivation at Work Moderates the Effects of Proactive Work Behavior on Employee Job Strain. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 100, 15-26.   Dr Deirdre O’Shea Lecturer at the Kemmy Business School University of...

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Collins McNicholas Host Networking Event in Eindhoven

On the 7th of September 2017, Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group hosted a successful Irish networking event in Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Over the past decade we have placed over 300 engineers in The Netherlands, so the purpose of the event was to bring the Irish community in Eindhoven and surrounding areas together to celebrate the success of all our placements in the region, to check their progress since moving out there and ultimately to encourage them to network with each other and strengthen the Irish community there. The event was held in the surreal setting of PSV Eindhoven’s Philips Stadium, where we had access to the dressing rooms, warm-up area and pitch-side. The dressing rooms presented an ideal atmosphere for everyone to get to know each other over some finger food and drinks on the house, and the feedback from those who attended was extremely positive. The evening began with introductions and complimentary snacks. The atmosphere was very casual and allowed us all to get to know each other, and the staff in the arena were exceptional. As the night moved on we raffled off two-tickets for the All-Ireland Football Final, which went down extremely well with our guests needless to say, before concluding with some words of thanks. It was refreshing to learn that all the people we have helped to place in The Netherlands have been treated brilliantly out there and settled in quickly. If you would be interested in a move to The Netherlands check out our webpage www.collinsmcnicholas.ie/netherlands or get in touch with us today.                ...

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How to Change Culture, Deliver an ‘Out of Office’ Message and Reclaim Time For Yourself

Question: I am a manager in a high-paced media company. While I enjoy my job, the pressure is relentless. There are just not enough hours in the day to get all the work done and even when I get home, there is the pressure to be ‘always on’ and answer emails right up to bedtime. There is never a chance to recharge the batteries and I am in danger of burning out. How can I carve out some ‘me time’ without coming across to my bosses as being unavailable?   Answer: We will spend a third of our life working and that does not include the extra hours we clock up between overtime, skipped lunches and answering emails after hours. Many employees feel compelled to put in that extra time to impress their employers, while others feel their company culture encourages working outside of office hours so the pressure is there to be ‘switched on’ constantly. In this fast-living environment many feel there are just not enough hours in the day for ‘me time’. It is very easy for the needs of the business to spill over into your personal time and you end up prioritising work over other parts of your life. Many organisations may overload employees, contacting them outside of business hours and making last-minute requests. Often the employees and managers feel the need to put in the extra hours to deal with these demands – arrive early, stay late, come in at the weekends and have the mobile and laptop ready to respond 24/7. But the reality is you cannot be available 24/7 and you should...

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Top Five Lifestyle Reasons Why Limerick is Now a Location of Choice for Job Seekers

1. Plentiful Job Opportunities – Job opportunities are on the rise in Limerick in many sectors, and at all levels. This is great news for job seekers who may have had to relocate previously to other parts of Ireland in the last few years when the recession hit, and would now like the opportunity to move back to their hometown. The unemployment rate in Ireland has reduced to 6.6% in February 2017 from 8.4% in February 2016. 2. Educational Facilities – Limerick takes pride in the education facilities it provides. It is home to one of Ireland’s top universities – the University of Limerick. The University of Limerick provides its students with a great variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses to choose from and has a booming employment rate for graduates that is 20% higher than the other six Universities in Ireland. http://www.ul.ie/news-centre/news/university-of-limerick-is-ranked-within-top-150-of-worlds-young-universitie   3. City of Culture – The people of Limerick are now creating a more vibrant culture in the city with continuous improvements to the cities social and cultural amenities through expansion, development and regeneration. This is all part of the “Limerick 2020 campaign” to be recognised as a European Capital of Culture in 2020. Exciting upcoming events and things to do can be found on https://www.limerick.ie/visiting/whatson     4. Sporting Facilities – Limerick has extensive sporting facilities. Thomond Park is the home ground of Munster Rugby which is one of the most famous rugby clubs in the world. Other well-known sporting facilities include the Gaelic Grounds which is the main GAA stadium in Limerick city, home to several hurling and football teams. If you are interested in...

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Collins McNicholas Presents Pieta House with a Cheque for €6,000

  Collins McNicholas were delighted to present Pieta House with a cheque for €6,000 in January this year. We raised this money over the course of 2016 through a series of events, which included table quizzes, coffee mornings, and a sponsored skydive to be held at the start of April. We are proud to support this worthy cause and look forward to making more fundraising contributions to Pieta House throughout 2017. Again, we would like to thank everyone who helped us during the year and all who donated their time and their money. We have a number of fundraising events planned for this year. First up is a sponsored skydive. Four Collins McNicholas staff will be jumping out of a plane 10,000ft above the earth on Friday, 7th April. They have been working hard raising money for the last number of months and anyone that wishes to sponsor them and donate to Pieta House can do so here. What Pieta House Does Pieta House, the centre for the prevention of self-harm or suicide, provides a professional one-to-one therapeutic service for people who are experiencing suicidal ideation, people who have attempted suicide and people who are engaging in self-harm. The centre has grown to almost 180 therapists and administration staff, and in 2014 alone, over 5,000 people came through their doors suffering from suicidal ideation or engaging in self-harm. This service is provided free of charge and they rely on fundraising events to provide 90% of their income. They currently have nine centres in Ireland, four in Dublin, and one each in Limerick, Cork, Galway, Tipperary, and Kerry. One of...

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2016 CIPD National Conference in Croke Park, Dublin

Members of the Collins McNicholas team had the pleasure of attending the CIPD National Conference in Croke Park, Dublin last week. We had the opportunity to hear about best practice, research and case studies in the area of Wellbeing and Neuroscience, as well as network with HR professionals from around Ireland. Speakers included Professor Sir Cary Cooper, Julian Yarr of A&L Goodbody and representatives of Bord Gais and Mercer. Top 5 pointers regarding wellbeing and engagement to take back to the office: Focus on quality, rather than quantity of time spent at work – “presenteeism” is as worrying an issue as absenteeism. Expectations are changing – employees now expect flexibility, understanding and openness from their organisation – and it is vital that organisations change to meet these expectations. Emotional Intelligence or empathy is set to be the most sought after qualities in leaders. Wellness initiatives are accessible for all organisations – often changes can be introduced for little or no cost. Fitness of mind is closely connected to physical health and fitness – stay hydrated, exercise for 20 minutes every day, get 7-8 hours’ sleep per night and try to avoid stress. Caroline Ward HR Services Manager Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services...

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