Recruitment | Collins McNicholas

Half-Way Point Shows Positive Employment Trends for 2017

Half-Way Point Shows Positive Employment Trends for 2017Collins McNicholas has seen a 6% growth in registered job vacancies in the first half of 2017 compared with the first half of 2016. The number of candidates registered with Collins McNicholas is up by 24% in the same period. The growth in jobs shows a buoyant job market with candidates willing to switch jobs to take advantage of more promising opportunities. Collins McNicholas opened its Limerick office in February this year and that has partly contributed to the increase in candidates. However, candidates have more confidence in the job market now and they are seeing lots of opportunities out there. The unemployment rate for June 2017 was 6.3%, down from 6.7% in January 2017 and down from 8.3% in June 2016. The government expects the unemployment rate to fall below 5% next year. Brexit offers both a challenge and an opportunity with more companies in the UK considering relocating to Ireland. Foreign investment has continued to grow and IDA Ireland has reported a comparable financial investment from FDI as in 2016 but with a greater number of jobs being created. Job announcements from FDI approvals have risen from 9,000 in the first half of 2016 to 11,000 in 2017. Announcements from Microsoft of 600 jobs, and Zendesk of 500, show the demand for technology professionals is still growing strong. Financial services and life sciences continue to perform well – Northern trust announced 400 jobs for its Limerick office and MSD announced 330 jobs for its Carlow and Cork sites. Niall Murray, Managing Director of Collins McNicholas, commented on the labour market by saying, ‘it has been a very positive start to 2017 for job creation and I expect this to continue in the second half of the year. Our clients are very positive about the prospects of job growth and we are seeing a very strong demand for experienced professionals in the medical device and biopharma sectors, particularly for niche engineering skills, and for software developers and finance professionals. With the growth in demand for the top professional talent in recent years, companies are showing a greater willingness to invest in the training and development of graduates, and younger professionals, that show a lot of potential. Companies are putting much more emphasis on the development and retention of their core teams. We are seeing a tightness in the labour market with greater competition between companies for this top tier of talent. Despite this pressure on the talent supply, growth in graduate output, the return of Irish citizens from overseas and the streamlined visa system has enabled the labour market to successfully accommodate this rise in demand.’...

Read More

Data Protection – The General Data Protection Regulation

The long awaited General Data Protection Regulation is now set to be implemented on the 25th May 2018 across the European Union. The GDPR shall replace the existing Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC which has been in place since 1995 and will have a significant impact for all organisations doing business in Ireland and the EU. The aim of the aforementioned Regulation is to harmonise data protection across Europe and to make businesses more accountable for data privacy compliance. The GDPR will apply to both data controllers and data processors. The implementation of the GDPR introduces new elements and significant enhancements to European Data Protection law which will require detailed consideration by all organisations involved in processing personal data as there will be significant financial penalties for non-compliance. Some of the key changes introduced are as follows:- Consent There will be much stronger rules on consent. The GDPR will require a data subject’s consent to the processing of their personal data to be freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous. Reliance on silence, inactivity, or pre-ticked boxes will no longer be sufficient to constitute consent. It is also the case that data subjects will be permitted to withdraw their consent at any time.   Broader Definition of Personal Data The definition of ‘personal data’ is now broadened to include online identifiers, location data, and IP addresses. Also, the term ‘sensitive personal data’ has been broadened to include genetic and biometric data.   Reporting of Data Breaches The GDPR will bring in mandatory breach notifications. All breaches must be reported to the local data protection authority unless the breach is unlikely to...

Read More

The Year in Recruitment 2016

2016 was another good year for job growth in Ireland. Over the course of the year, unemployment dropped from 8.9% to 7.2%, to reach an eight year low. Foreign Investment IDA Ireland companies performed very well in 2016, with employment by overseas companies almost reaching the 200,000 mark. These companies created just under 19,000 jobs and had the lowest level of job losses in 19 years, giving them a net job increase of 11,842 jobs in 2016. More importantly, every region of the country experienced a net job increase. It is vital that more jobs are created outside of the main urban centres. Dublin has enjoyed strong job growth for a few years but economic recovery has been slower to arrive to the more rural parts of the country. This makes the net job increase in each region by IDA companies particularly significant. International services, financial services, pharmaceuticals and medical devices were all cited by IDA Ireland as sectors that provided robust job growth. Collins McNicholas Director Michelle Murphy emphasised the importance of the projects happening outside of Dublin, particularly in the West: ‘We are seeing more large scale investment in regional locations. Companies such as Zeltiq and Siteminder, both of whom invested in Galway this year, are realising the depth of talent that is available throughout the country. The quality of the workforce, combined with lower overall costs, makes these locations attractive to multinationals investing in Ireland, and in the process generate vital regional employment.’ Migration Ireland has experienced net inward migration for the first time since 2009. Irish nationals, however, continue to experience net outward migration, but...

Read More

The Olympic Recruitment Race

    The repetitiveness of applying for jobs continuously can sometimes feel like running a marathon; drawn-out, tiring, painstaking and seemingly never-ending. However, using the right tools and going about it the right away can turn a marathon into a 100 metre sprint. Preparation Have an up to date CV and cover letter ready to go. It should be well-written, neatly formatted and include all of the key information for obtaining the role. This is a crucial first step in your preparation. Just like an athlete tailors her preparation to maximise her chances in each race, your CV and cover letter should be tailored specifically for each job you apply for. Don’t send out the same old tired, generic CV over and over.Application forms require a lot of attention to detail so make sure you fill these out carefully. A mistake can harm your chances of being progressed to interview stage. Performance under Pressure Once you have gotten past the application stage next comes the interview. This section is down to your performance on the day, but with proper preparation success is achievable. Remember, failing to prepare means you are preparing to fail. Take an athletes approach to preparation and practice your answers again and again until you can perform them without hesitation. Being able to perform when the pressure is on is what separates good athletes from great athletes and good job candidates from great job candidates. So, as part of your preparation, know who you will be meeting, practice your interview questions and competency questions to make sure you won’t stumble and fall along the way, and dress for success. Post-Performance...

Read More

Using the STAR Technique When Preparing for an Interview

For many candidates, the interview process can be a very overwhelming experience with many fearing they will fail to recall important details and undersell their ability. The STAR technique is a method used to help candidates prepare for interviews, especially competency based interviews. This method will allow you to form your answers efficiently, focusing directly on the question being asked. What are competency based interviews? Competency based interviews are designed to make the job application process unbiased as each candidate is asked the same types of questions. This form on interviewing is commonly practiced in large organisations. An example of a competency based question may begin with “Tell me about a time when…” This may not seem difficult, however, during the interview it is common for candidates to leave out information and wander off topic, therefore, delivering an unstructured answer. It is important that you “sell yourself” during the interview while following the STAR technique to structure your answers. So what is the STAR technique? Your answer should incorporate the following elements: S – Situation T – Task A – Action R – Result Situation: Describe the background of a particular situation when you used the competency.  For example, if the competency is budgetary control, you may answer; “In my last job I was appointed to lead a project involving a €800,000 engineering factory shutdown lasting 3 weeks, and I had complete responsibility for the budget for this project. I did face some challenges on this project which required careful management to keep to budget.” Task: Define what your particular task was in relation to this, i.e. “My duty...

Read More

The Future is Biopharma

Last Thursday saw the Life Science Team of Recruitment Consultants from Collins McNicholas’ Galway office descend upon the grounds of UCD in Blackrock where NIBRT is located. NIBRT is an acronym for the National Institute of Bioprocessing, Research & Training and is a state-of-the-art facility for training and research in bioprocessing. Their aim is to support the bioprocessing industry by providing a unique learning experience in an environment that replicates a modern industrial bioprocessing facility. As we at Collins McNicholas recruit nationwide, within both the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors, it is a huge advantage to visit a facility such as NIBRT and gain an understanding of the industry, its processes, and the challenges it faces. Our day was divided up into 3 lectures – the first one being a very interesting and informative overview of small and large molecular chemistry, and an introduction to the biopharmaceutical industry. We also got a basic overview of the bioprocessing process – which was really brought to life during a plant tour that took place after lunch. When it came to the NIBRT pilot plant tour there was a sense of déjà vu gowning up given my years spent as a Biochemist within the immuno-assay industry. During the tour we got to see how the various aspects of the bioprocessing process works – upstream processing, recovery, downstream processing and purification, and finally formulation and filling. To witness how each part of the process takes place really helped us as recruitment consultants understand the demands of the roles we help biopharmaceutical companies fill – from microbiologists to process scientists, and engineers to micro-analysts. After...

Read More