Industry | Collins McNicholas

What Skills Do ICT Companies Need Most?

What Skills Do ICT Companies Need Most?ICT is the fastest expanding industry in Ireland. There is a relentless demand for new employees with the right ICT skills. Demand cuts across virtually every industry. Approximately 60% of ICT professionals are employed in the broad ICT sector, while 40% are employed in other sectors of the economy. Demand for ICT professionals will grow at 5% a year until 2018 and there is expected to be 44,500 job openings in the period 2014- 2018. The European Commission estimates that Europe could face an 800,000 person ICT skills shortage by 2020. The shortage of talent in ICT is a global problem. This is due to unprecedented growth and innovation in the sector. What matters most is what the government is doing to grow the supply of tech talent for the industry in Ireland. The ICT sector is constantly transforming, this impacts the demand for certain skills, and creates new areas of expertise. Subsectors with the most vacancies include programming technologies, mobile technologies, games development, web development, cloud computing, platform administration, digital and creative media, networking, CRM, project management, data analytics, and contact centre support. Skills Shortages The greatest need within ICT in Ireland is for professionals with experience as: software engineers and programmers, with programming ability in Java, JavaScript, C#, C++, C+++, .Net, SQL, Perl, Ruby, and Python; web developers, with skills in HTML, CSS, XHHTML, Ruby, and an understanding of Web 2.0 technologies; games developers; software developers for operating platforms, especially Windows and UNIX/Linux; computer architects and administrators, with skills in big data analytics, customer relationship management applications and SQL server database administrators; cloud computing specialists, with cloud infrastructure, VMWare and other virtualisation technology skills; network specialist engineers; security experts; mobile technology applications developers; ICT project managers; and tech support experts. Conversion Courses A report by FIT, an industry-led research group, in 2014, suggests that many of the 5,000 or so vacancies could be filled by people that have completed a 6-24 month conversion course. Springboard, and other ICT skills conversion courses, have been addressing this problem and have made a large number of course places available. Springboard launched 21 ICT courses as part of its 2014 curriculum and offered 40 ICT conversion courses in the 2015/16 academic year increasing it to 55 ICT conversion courses for the 2016/17 academic year. STEM Programme The STEM programme encourages students to pursue science, engineering, and technology careers by promoting the benefits of working in these professions to secondary students. Since 2012, and the introduction of bonus points for taking higher level maths in the leaving certificate, there has been a 58% increase in the numbers taking higher level maths. The number of NFQ Level 8 graduates has doubled since 2012, and there has been 2,000 graduates from ICT conversion courses at Level 8 or higher, up to 2014. The level of industry demand being met through domestic higher education output has increased from 45% in 2012 to over 60% in 2014. This is considerable progress in a short amount of time, nevertheless, with almost 40% of demand either being supported by international recruitment, or going unmet, there is still a lot of progress to be made before the skills shortage problem is resolved. Overall, the outlook is positive, with the Higher Education Authority (HEA) projecting a 69% increase in Level 8 computing graduates, a 50% increase in Masters level computer graduates, a 106% increase in level 8 electronic engineering graduates, and a 164% increase in Masters level electronic engineering graduates, for the period 2013-2018. Initiatives such as Coderdojo, which teaches young kids to code, are key to stimulating an interest in this sector at an early age in the next generation of students. Demand & Career Prospects We are seeing strong demand for ICT professionals and the career prospects for those entering the industry are excellent. There has been significant progress in increasing the supply of ICT professionals to meet expanding industry demand. This has gone some way to alleviating the skills shortage in the sector. International recruitment will continue to be an important factor in the Irish ICT sector, but the increase in domestic output must be maintained at its current pace for the sector to continue to thrive on these shores. Despite the tight skill supply we are seeing the better tech companies filling the majority of their positions without much difficulty. These firms typically offer the best packages to recruits and are able to attract the very best talent as a result. The country is moving in the right direction and the medium term outlook is strong. The correct steps have been taken to increase the skills supply, and are already beginning to bear fruit. Conclusion Talent remains the central criteria for this industry. Shortages in key skills are impacting the industry across the world, and the regions that produce the best talent, and can meet industry demands, will go the furthest in attracting ICT investment. We expect the strong pipeline of talent that has been developed in recent years to largely satisfy the growing demands of the tech industry in Ireland. Ireland’s prospects within the global tech industry look very positive.   Niall Murray Managing Director Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services...

Read More

The ICT Industry in Ireland 2016 – Regional Overview

Dublin Dublin is the centre of the tech industry in Ireland and the majority of ICT investment is concentrated in the city.  Dublin has many of the world’s largest ICT companies; online service companies such as Google, which has over 2,500 staff, Facebook, Amazon, Yahoo, Twitter, Hubspot, Dropbox, LinkedIn, and countless other companies all call Dublin their home. The Silicon Docks is the hub for the ICT industry in Dublin, with a thriving mix of multinationals and start-ups. Opportunities exist for the broadest range of skill sets – software development, cybersecurity, networking and infrastructure, data analytics, cloud computing, and tech support. Dublin is increasingly seen as an attractive location for globally minded tech talent. The cost and availability of housing in the Dublin area may see some investment shift to other locations despite the highly competitive packages offered by most tech companies. South Cork is the location of several major multinational operations as well as numerous smaller companies. EMC, Apple, VMWare, McAfee, CitCo, Tyco, Qualcomm, and Amazon, all have facilities in the city. EMC employs 3,000 people and has expanded its staff as recently as 2013. It is looking to continue this expansion by pushing its research agenda, focusing on cloud storage, cloud security and compliance. Apple has continued to expand its workforce and now employs over 5,000 people. South East Ciphertechs in Kilkenny, an information security firm, and Bluefin Payment Systems in Waterford, a fintech company, have both announced plans to expand their workforces in the region. Waterford operates a number of research institutes out of Waterford IT that are collaborating with tech companies. Sunlife, a fintech firm, employs...

Read More

Trends in the ICT sector

Trends in the ICT Sector The Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) identified what it termed ‘third platform’ technologies as the key technological developments that would have the biggest impact on the ICT sector in the future. These are: cloud computing, mobile devices and technologies, the internet of things (IOT), big data analytics, social technologies, artificial intelligence, advanced robotics, 3D printing, augmented/virtual reality, and cybersecurity. The EGFSN estimates that there will be $5 trillion in ICT spending globally by 2020. About 40% of this revenue, and most of its growth, will be from these ‘third platform’ technologies. This growth will be driven by a rapid expansion in the number of users, the number of connected devices, and the number of applications and services. Cloud Computing & Big Data Analytics Two of the fastest growing subsectors within ICT are cloud computing and big data analytics. The global cloud computing market is expected to reach $287 billion by 2018, according to research firm Gartner Inc., giving it a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 17.1% from 2011-18. The global market for big data analytics is forecasted to grow at a CAGR of 18.45% to 2021, taking the size of the market from $28.6 billion in 2016 to $66.8 billion in 2021. Big Data is a relatively small but fast growing subsector of ICT. There will be a strong demand in business for users with the data analytical and statistical skills to utilise this resource. The Irish government has funded several academic research facilities in this space to foster the skills and technologies necessary for future growth. All of these research...

Read More

Collins McNicholas Quarterly Jobs Market Report Q2 2016

Collins McNicholas has seen a 4.8% growth in registered job vacancies in the first six months of 2016 compared with the last 6 months of 2015. The number of candidates registering with Collins McNicholas has increased by 2.8% in the same period. The unemployment rate currently stands at 7.8% (MAY 2016), having fallen steadily from 9.8% over the last 12 months. The unemployment rate will continue to decline over the next 12 months, albeit at a slower pace than the previous 12 months. The Irish economy continues to grow and job creation should rise with it, but the consequences of Britain’s departure from the EU will have a negative impact on the Irish economy, slowing growth and job creation. A weakening sterling will hurt Irish exports to Britain, particularly in the agricultural sector. Tourism will also be affected as British holidaymakers will find it more expensive to visit Ireland. Issues surrounding the rights to residency of the roughly 400,000 Irish people living in the UK will also need to be resolved. This could benefit Ireland if even a small of number of skilled professionals choose to return to the country. “However, despite the uncertain consequences of Brexit on the Irish economy, foreign direct investment (FDI) is strong and should grow as investors seek to maintain access to the EU markets and avoid the uncertainty over Britain’s status post-Brexit,” said Niall Murray, Managing Director of Collins McNicholas. High technology sectors, in particular ICT, biopharmaceuticals and medical devices, are doing well. Graduate output has increased significantly in the STEM subjects and excellent progress has been made in retraining people for jobs in...

Read More

The Future is Biopharma

Last Thursday saw the Life Science Team of Recruitment Consultants from Collins McNicholas’ Galway office descend upon the grounds of UCD in Blackrock where NIBRT is located. NIBRT is an acronym for the National Institute of Bioprocessing, Research & Training and is a state-of-the-art facility for training and research in bioprocessing. Their aim is to support the bioprocessing industry by providing a unique learning experience in an environment that replicates a modern industrial bioprocessing facility. As we at Collins McNicholas recruit nationwide, within both the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors, it is a huge advantage to visit a facility such as NIBRT and gain an understanding of the industry, its processes, and the challenges it faces. Our day was divided up into 3 lectures – the first one being a very interesting and informative overview of small and large molecular chemistry, and an introduction to the biopharmaceutical industry. We also got a basic overview of the bioprocessing process – which was really brought to life during a plant tour that took place after lunch. When it came to the NIBRT pilot plant tour there was a sense of déjà vu gowning up given my years spent as a Biochemist within the immuno-assay industry. During the tour we got to see how the various aspects of the bioprocessing process works – upstream processing, recovery, downstream processing and purification, and finally formulation and filling. To witness how each part of the process takes place really helped us as recruitment consultants understand the demands of the roles we help biopharmaceutical companies fill – from microbiologists to process scientists, and engineers to micro-analysts. After...

Read More

The Medtech Industry in Ireland – Regional Overview Part 2

This is part 2 of our regional overview of the medical device industry in Ireland. Last week we looked at the West of Ireland, today we look at the South, South East and Midlands regions. South Cork has significant expertise in orthopaedic technologies. Stryker, which manufactures orthopaedic implants, minimally invasive surgical equipment and neurovascular products, is the biggest medical device employer in Cork. Stryker are building a new 44,000 sq. ft. surgical innovation centre in Cork that will conduct research on the surgical issues of bone cutting and soft tissue dissection. Stryker employs 1,200 people across its 3 Irish sites, two of which are located in Cork. DePuy Synthes produces orthopaedic knees and hips from its Cork plant, employing over 600 people. This site also includes a global supply chain operation and an R&D Innovation Centre. Boston Scientific employs approximately 1,100 people in Cork and produces over 5,600 devices, primarily for their Cardiology, Rhythm and Vascular Group, Endoscopy, and Urology & Women’s Health Divisions. ‘ South East Waterford hosts contact lens manufacturer Bausch & Lomb and precision engineering company Schivo. Bausch & Lomb is investing €75 million to increase its manufacturing capacity. Nypro Healthcare announced plans to establish a state-of-the-art facility in Waterford, which will create more than 200 jobs manufacturing complex respiratory and injection devices. Clearstream in Enniscorthy, which was bought by CR Bard, has added 160 roles since 2011 and, after a significant capital investment in its facility, will have the capacity to add 200 more roles in the coming years. Boston Scientific employs over 700 people in Clonmel and manufactures all of their pacemakers and implantable defibrillators...

Read More