4 Career Lessons Learned from Marathon Training

4 Career Lessons Learned from Marathon Training

4 Career Lessons Learned from Marathon Training - Collins McNicholas

For some of us this weekend in not just any Bank Holiday weekend, it’s the Dublin City Marathon Weekend. Over 14,000 people will be lining up to compete in or complete the 26.2 mile race. Having spent many many hours and many many miles training for the event, below are some reflections on how lessons learned here can be applied in the work environment:

  1. Set a clear, stretching but achievable goal

Success looks different for everyone.  In the marathon, there are some who are hoping to complete the distance in under 3 hours or with a new “personal best” and there are the rest of us who are happy to complete it at all! It’s important to set a goal with clear milestones and a definite concept of what “good” looks like.  While a goal which is too easy to achieve can lead to failure to fulfil potential, an overly complex or ridiculous goal can cause the project or race to derail very quickly.

 

  1. Maintain a positive mindset

In business, in life, in marathon running, there will always be challenges.  It is important to remain positive, remember the long term goal and reassess your approach if necessary.

This means letting go of the elements of a project which just aren’t working, learning from setbacks and adjusting your approach in the face of changing circumstances.

 

  1. Consistency is key

While quite a mundane concept, behaving in a consistent and reliable way is one of the most important elements in growing a strong customer base, developing good relationships with co-workers and building fitness and endurance. Following the training plan, responding to queries and requests within a set timeframe and maintaining impeccable quality standards all follow from a consistent predictable approach.

 

  1. Keep focussed, right to the end

At the outset of a new role, project or marathon training cycle the initial enthusiasm and optimism can act as a strong driver.  Miles 1-10 can go quite well based on the sense of excitement and occasion alone.  However, by mile 20 it takes a strong focus to carry you on to the finish line and it becomes easier to make excuses, amend your goal and justify giving up.  Keeping focused right throughout the task, project or race means that you can overcome these tough times and reach your goal.

 

Best of luck to everyone taking part in the Dublin City Marathon 2015 this weekend from all at Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group!

 

Caroline Ward (also taking part in the Dublin City Marathon 2015!)

HR Services Consultant

Collins McNicholas Recruitment & HR Services Group